The Draw

  1. There are at least 5 rounds depend on number of team registration, first preliminary round (English test), preliminary round (all teams), Quarter Final round, Semi-Final round, and Grand Final round. 

  2. Each team will compete at least 5 matches in the preliminary round before progression. There are a maximum of 8 rounds to the final and it is depend on the team registration caps if number of rounds should be added or taken away. 

  3. At the end of the preliminary rounds, teams shall be ranked according to the number of wins. If teams are tied on the same number of wins, they shall be separated by the average judges' scores for each team who are higher score.

  4. At the end of the championships, teams’ final rankings shall be determined as follows. The champions and runners-up shall be ranked 1 and 2 respectively

  5. All other teams shall be ranked according the round of the championships the team reached and, where equal, their preliminary round ranking.

  6. The Grand Final shall be on a topic announced at the same time as the topics for the prepared debates in the preliminary rounds.

  7. If any team withdraw during the competition, the other team will progress to the next round automatically.

The formate 

  • Teams in a debate there are: one team proposes the motion for debate, the other team opposes it. 

  • Each school can send a team up to 5 people but only 3 speak in any given debate, there are two teams in each debate and each one is allocated a side of the motion.

  • Each speaker gives a 7-minute speech that supports their side of the motion in accordance with their various speaker role; for example, the first speaker must contextualise the debate, set the definitions and provide substantiated arguments for their side of the debate. And 4 minutes for reply speeches. 

  • The first and last minutes of each of the main speeches is referred to as protected time. This means that no interruptions to the speech are permitted. During the rest of the speech, debaters from the other team may attempt to interrupt the speaker with short questions or comments called points of information.

  • After the main speeches, the debates move on to the reply speeches that are given by either the first or second speaker of each team with the opposition going first. No points of information are permitted during this speech. Reply speeches last 4 minutes and are supposed to give a biased overview of the debate by indicating why the main arguments of the debate fall on their side in order to help the judges decide who to vote for.

  •  During a debate, if a speaker declares that they are unable to make their speech, another speaker from that team who was announced by the chairperson as speaking in that debate may give a speech in substitution.

  • If a substitute speech is given in accordance with this rule, judges shall award that speech the lowest possible score within the Marking Standard in the Judging Schedule, regardless of the quality of the speech.

  • The marks for a substitute speech shall not be used in the calculation for any individual speaker rankings or awards.

  • However, if a substitute reply speech is given by the first or second speaker of the team, and judges shall award that speech the appropriate score in accordance with the Judging Schedule.

1.      (a) There are two teams on each side of the debate. Each team consists of three members.

(b) After all speakers have spoken once, the first or second speaker from each side gives a reply speech. The speaker from the Opposition team starts first then the Government team.

2. The host is encouraged to run other competitions on different debating styles during the Championships.

3.      (a) Speeches should last for 7 minutes, and for reply speeches 4 minutes. 

(b) The method of signalling timing for speakers is at the discretion of the host.

(c) In addition to time signals referred to in rule 3 (b), team members or team coach may give time signals to a speaker provided that the signals are discreet and unobtrusive.

3A.    (a) Before a debate begins, each team must inform the chairperson of the names of their three speakers and the order they will be speaking in.

(b) The only persons who may speak in a debate are the three speakers for each team announced by the chairperson at the start of that debate.

(c) During a debate, speakers may not communicate with their coach, other team members who are not speaking in that debate, or any person in the audience, except to receive time signals in accordance with rule 3 (c).

(d) Notwithstanding rule 3A (b), if, during a debate, a speaker declares that they are unable to make their speech, another speaker from that team who was announced by the chairperson as speaking in that debate may give a speech in substitution.

(e) If a substitute speech is given in accordance with rule 3A (d), judges shall award that speech the lowest possible score within the Marking Standard, regardless of the quality of the speech. (If such a situation occurs, the marks for this speech shall not be used in the calculation for any individual speaker rankings or awards.)

(f) Rule 3A (e) shall not apply in the case of reply speeches provided that, in accordance with rule 1(b), the reply speech is delivered by either the first or second speaker from each team.

The Judging

  • Judges mark independently of each other, and should sit apart from each other during the debate so that they cannot see each other's marking sheets.

  • At the end of the debate, in the preliminary round, the judges fill in their marking sheets, and hand them to the runner responsible for collecting the marking sheet before leaving the debate room briefly to confer.

  • The purpose of the conference is to brief one of the judges to give a short adjudication on behalf of the judges.

  • The adjudication should be short, and should explain the result to the audience. In particular, it should set out the key reasons why the winning team won, and comment on significant matters of debate styles or techniques that were displayed in the debate.

  • The adjudication should be constructive, not negative.

 

The Marking Standard

  •  Each speaker's substantive speech is marked out of 100, with 40 for content, 40 for style and 20 for strategy.

  • The reply speech is marked out of 50, with 20 for content, 20 for style and 10 for strategy.

  • In order to encourage consistency of marks, speeches are marked within the accepted range of marks and judges may not go outside that range.

  • Judges may not use any other marking standard or categorise of marks.

  • If a debater declares that they are unable to make their speech after a debate has begun, another member of their team who was announced by the chairperson as being a speaker in that debate may speak in their place. In such a situation judges shall award the speech the lowest possible score within the Marking Standard, regardless of the quality of the speech.

  • Content is the argument used by the speaker, divorced from the speaking style.

  • If an argument is weak it should be marked accordingly, even if the other team does not expose its weakness.

  • In deciding the strength or weakness of an argument, judges should not be influenced by their own personal beliefs or specialised knowledge.

  • Style is the way speakers speak.

  • Judges should make allowance for different accents, speaking styles and debating terminology.

  • Debaters for whom English is a second language shall be judged as if they were native English speakers.

  • In general, the use of palm-cards, lecterns, folders, notepads or other forms of speakers notes should not affect the mark a speaker is given.

  • However, speakers should not read their speeches, but should use notes that they refer to only from time to time.

  • Strategy covers two concepts:

    • Whether the speaker understands what are the issues of the debate, and The structure and timing of the speaker's speech.

    • A speaker who answers the critical issues with weak responses should get poor marks for content but good marks for strategy.